Food Grows Where Water Flows

For more than 25 years, the California Farm Water Coalition has been working with our members to share information about farm water issues, and reminding Californians that "Food Grows Where Water Flows."

Be a part of the effort!

Request a free “Food Grows Where Water Flows” vehicle decal
Request free truck/trailer signs for commodity trailers
Sponsor a "Food Grows Where Water Flows" highway sign

 

Sarah Woolf on the importance of USBR water deliveries-

"For over 40 years, my family has farmed in the Westlands Water District producing Garlic, Parsley, Onions, Lettuce, Tomatoes, Cotton, Wheat, Peppers, and Melons. During those 40 years, we have learned and adopted new technologies in farming and irrigation practices.  Our entire farm is operated year in and year out on drip irrigation.  We utilize the highest levels of moisture monitoring systems, solar power and minimally impactful equipment available on the market today.  Even with the most advance technologies, we still need water to grow any of our crops.  The Central Valley Project is the only source of this critical water supply.  As those supplies have continued to shrink year after year, we have produced less and less food for the United States.  Our labor force has gotten smaller and our cost of doing business has continued to go up with less production.  With no apparent resolution to the continual decline of water supply to agriculture in the San Joaquin Valley, we are seeing our communities and business’ dying.  The ability to plan for the future and continue to invest in the most advanced technologies diminishes.  Our family is forced to survive rather than invest in our future.  

The increased  water demands of population growth, environmental needs and agriculture production are real and must be addressed.  It is important to ensure any one entity is not removed or diminished in priority.  All entities have value and are a critical part of the overall success of the state, but any one will not survive without the other."

Sarah Woolf, Farmer